Artists Spotlight

Oct-Dec

For this quarter, we’re featuring the five artists who demonstrated their creative processes at the 2018 Open Awards Show, held Aug.29-Sept. 3, 2018 at the Buena Vista Community Center. Here, you’ll find a bit about each artist as well as Web site and contact information.

Evelyn Baker

"I strive to take viewers to that place where I looked down and was inspired by what I saw.”

Evelyn’s journey to her unique fused glass pate’de verre (glass paste) technique brings her over 20 years of experience in the arts to fruition. Her graphic arts and engineering experience, studies in watercolor and oil painting, stained glass, and fused glass shape not only how she perceives the landscape around her but how she approaches her art.

 

“Living in Colorado, I find it natural to try to capture the beauty of our local landscape into works of art using glass. . . . I strive to take viewers to that place where I looked down and was inspired by what I saw.”

 

Baker’s “Bones-Group,” a set of various small bone pieces and sections (mid-left), won Honorable Mention in the Bullseye Glass Emerge 2018 show. Baker has developed a technique that allows extreme realism in her pieces without molds to cast them.

 

“My experience as a Test Engineer has proved invaluable in shaping the discipline necessary for the methodical, detailed testing required to create the complex firing schedules for this method, which must account for shrinkage, varying thicknesses, and the way in which heat affects individual components. It is my pleasure to share this technique through teaching other artists, as well as through the display and sale of the resulting sculptures.”

 

For more information, see her work at: https://glassfractions.com/

Marika Guthrie

A self-proclaimed “fabric junkie,” Marika crafts her intricate and often whimsical landscapes from fabrics assembled by hand onto old wood. The techniques she uses are uniquely her own, brought about by her limited sewing abilities, which sparked her exploration into other ways of bringing fabrics together to form a piece of art on woods.

 

“I am as much a sucker for broken-down furniture as I am for fabric. Unwanted cabinets, broken chair seats, discarded wooden platters all offer a lot of personality to my pieces.”

 

She then cuts and assembles the various fabric pieces freehand, letting inspiration rather than a pattern guide her. She then adds finishing touches of acrylic paint for finer details.

 

Marika loves exploring the West’s hidden places. Her favorite mode is on her horse, Soldier—but any mode of transport will do.

 

“I take a lot of pleasure from my work. The grain of the wood, the beauty of the fabrics, the bright snap of sharp scissors, the warm adhesive fluid under my fingers. . . it all speaks to me. I am honored if it speaks to you.”

 

“I am as much a sucker for broken-down furniture as I am for fabric."

For more information on Marika Guthrie and her work, check out her Web site: https://www.thecontentedheart.com/about/

Barry Stevens

Barry Stevens’ passion for torch work and boroscilicate glass started after he took a jewelry class while in high school. The medium forced him to revision his bent for art into a more 3-D approach, and after taking a class with a local glass artist in Illinois, he was hooked.

 

Barry finds that borosilicate glass presents its own unique challenges, not the least of which are the changes heat causes in the glass’s chemistry and viscocity (resistance to flow). “There are no do-overs with glass,” he notes. “If you don’t get it right, your piece cracks—sometimes after several hours of work!”

 

Stevens has been practicing and perfecting his torch work for over 10 years. Vulcan Glass Art Studio, north of Buena Vista, sports three torches, state-of-the-art ventilation, kilns, and plenty of tools and materials. The studio, which can be rented, is also a prime spot for teaching as well as experimentation and creation. Stevens teaches classes to groups and individuals and frequently participates in festivals and shows around the country.

 

“My hope,” he says, “is that those who view my work become as fascinated as I am with this ancient medium.”   

 

See more of Barry’s work at: https://www.vulcanglassstudio.com/

“My hope is that those who view my work become as fascinated as I am with this ancient medium.”

Kathy Reinhold

Though her work has largely been representational, her love of painting and portraiture has turned lately into more free-form styles and methods.

 

“For the past several years,” she says, “I have been focusing on oil ‘rub-outs,’ which begin with a layer of burnt umber and oil of cloves on a canvas or board. Values can be then be manipulated with a soft cloth, and layers of color can be added when the first layer is dry.”  Kathy likes portraying faces, especially, and notes, “Some drawing and composition knowledge are helpful for this technique.”

But a new technique caught her attention last year. “I learned about ‘acrylic pours,’ which uses acrylic instead of oil, requires no drawing or artistic skill, and is abstract instead of representational. What the paint decides to do after you pour it on a surface is mostly out of your control. It is very freeing and fun, with a finished piece of art in minutes!” 

“My goal for this year is to combine the freedom and boldness of the pours to enhance my more representational portraits. And just have fun!” 

"What the paint decides to do after you pour it on a surface is mostly out of your control. It is very freeing and fun."

Alice Sawyer

"I am currently making jewelry as my medium, which I think could be connected to my ‘magpie-like’ attraction to found rocks, shells, and crystals."

“I’ve been a maker for much of my life,” Alice says, and she has found artistic fulfillment in more than one medium. Her current focus is jewelry, “which I think could be connected to my ‘magpie-like’ attraction to found rocks, shells, and crystals.”

 

Her jewelry also uses several techniques that help make it uniquely special including wire wrapping and weaving, metalsmithing and bead stringing, but she’s also just as likely to add other materials to a piece. Alice also attends workshops frequently and expands her knowledge with online courses.

 

“My motivations come from seeing shapes in nature, flattering jewelry pieces I’ve seen, or experimentation.”

 

She adds, “I work to make sure my jewelry is well-finished, and my friends often see my new projects in development because I ‘wear-test’ them to assure myself of the wear-ability, comfort, and quality.” She often uses aluminum in her pieces because it is lightweight yet beautiful.  

 

Though Sawyer does not yet have a Web site, she says she loves meeting customers. One way you can do that is see her booth at the Rocky Mountain Christmas Craft Fair, Saturday, November 17th, at the McGinnis Middle School Gym in Buena Vista. You can also e-mail her at offroundarts@yahoo.com or call (719) 395-4119.

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